Oklahoma State Home Builders Association

An Affiliate of the National Home Builders Association

The New American Home -- great first impression

 
Posted on February 15, 2015 by By Carol Hartzog Communications

The 2015 New American Home near Las Vegas/Trent Bell Photography
The 2015 New American Home near Las Vegas/Trent Bell Photography

By Tim Fall

Copyright © 2015, The Oklahoma Publishing Company

Some 400 Oklahoma homebuilders and hammer slingers of all descriptions attended the 2015 International Builders Show in Las Vegas, but a few skipped out for a while if they could to investigate another Vegas attraction.

Not Cirque du Soleil, or an Elvis impersonator, or even a roulette wheel.

Tony Foust
Tony Foust

What stole Moore-based builder Tony Foust's attention was a 13-mile bus ride from the Las Vegas Strip to Henderson, Nev., to tour what was called the New American Home.

Foust, founder of DaVinci Homes, said the New American Home, constructed annually in conjunction with the huge trade show, was "breathtaking.

At 5,891 square feet, the four-bedroom contemporary home is a "sort of a fantasy home in a lot of ways," Foust said, especially considering the nearly $3 million price tag, but it features "systems that really do fit our Oklahoma market."

Indoor-outdoor space in the New American Home at the International Builders Show in Las Vegas. Trent Bell Photography
Indoor-outdoor space in the New
American Home at the International
Builders Show in Las Vegas. Trent
Bell Photography”.

Built and designed by Las Vegas builder Blue Heron, the home was meant to present the nation's builders and others "a collection of takeaway ideas for every price point that can be rolled into mass production quickly and efficiently," according to the National Association of Home Builders, which organizes the International Builders Show

Foust, who holds the association's Certified Green Professional designation, said he was most impressed with the New American Home's energy efficiency, driven by an array of solar panels installed on the home's spacious flat roof. The panels use the desert sun to generate enough electricity during the day to upload excess power back onto the grid, making the house a "net-zero" energy consumer.

Read the entire article at newsok.com

Share and Enjoy :